The Scarsdale Inquirer – Hometown newspaper of Scarsdale, New York 10583

 

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obituary archives

Obituaries

Obituaries for current and former Scarsdale residents are posted online as they are received as a courtesy to family and friends who want to attend services. Obituaries are also printed in the newspaper on Friday if submitted to the editor, Debra Banerjee, by Tuesday at 5 p.m. There is no charge for publication. Submissions may be edited to conform with the paper's editorial style. To have an obituary published unedited, as a paid ad, contact Barbara Yeaker.

Charles Lippe Weinberg

Charles Lippe Weinberg died Feb. 15. He was 94.

An active alumnus of Fieldston, Dartmouth College and the Thayer School of Engineering, he went on to serve as a lieutenant with the Seabees in the Second World War and then enjoyed a long career as a builder and devoted member of his community, his family said.

Mr. Weinberg was a founder of both Westchester Reform Temple and Westhab, a not-for-profit provider of housing and social services for homeless and low-income families throughout Westchester County and New York City. Its mission is “Building Communities. Changing Lives,” and those are words by which he lived. To date, Westhab has built over 2,500 units of affordable housing.

Mr. Weinberg also served as vice chairman of the White Plains Hospital Foundation Board, president of the Builders Institute of Westchester & Putnam, and was a member of the Blythedale Children’s Hospital Board of Trustees, the Surprise Lake Camp Board of Directors, and the Peoples Westchester Savings Bank.

A world traveler with a special love for skiing, the arts and animals of all sizes, his trademarks were his quiet kindness and wit — and his ubiquitous yellow ties.

He is survived by Judith, his wife of 68 years, and their three children and spouses, David and Vivian Weinberg, Jean Weinberg and Mark Dinaburg, and Barbara and Walter Groden; his grandchildren, Deborah Groden, Philip Weinberg, Suzanne and David Laswell, and Sarah Dinaburg, along with many nieces and nephews. His older siblings, Jay Weinberg and Charlotte Pollack, predeceased him.

“Charles leaves behind a legacy of compassion, generosity and humility, and he will be endlessly missed,” his family said.

In lieu of flowers, contributions in his name may be made to the charity of the donor’s choice. 

A funeral service was held Feb. 19 at Westchester Reform Temple.


Robert Bowen Gillie

Robert Bowen Gillie died peacefully in Essex, Conn., on Feb. 6. He was 94. 

Mr. Gillie was a proud New Yorker, born in Manhattan, Sept. 25, 1920. He moved to Scarsdale in 1927 and graduated from Scarsdale High School. He attended Union College in Schenectady, where he was a cheerleader, a drummer and a president of the Phi Gamma Delta fraternity. 

Mr. Gillie obtained his pilot’s license while at Union and graduated with an economics degree in 1943 as part of an accelerated program for pilots. During World War II, Mr. Gillie was a flight instructor and trained pilots in B-17 and B-29 bombers. After the war, Mr. Gillie spent 50 years in the insurance business in New York City, eventually becoming vice president of the Harvey Dann Insurance Co.

Mr. Gillie enjoyed membership in the Scarsdale Town Club, the Scarsdale Fire Company #2, St. David’s Society (Welsh) and the Hitchcock Presbyterian Church of Scarsdale. He was president of the University Club of White Plains and a member of the Board of Governors of the Scarsdale Golf Club. He was also an avid tennis and paddle tennis player in Scarsdale, winning numerous trophies for his club team. He was an accomplished photographer who built his own dark room to develop his artistic compositions.

As a consummate handyman, Mr. Gillie mastered diverse aspects of plumbing, electricity and woodworking, and spent many hours upgrading the property and renovating rooms throughout the house. Over the years he took great pride in maintaining his neatly manicured yard, spending much time weeding, planting and grooming for the perfect garden design. Mr. Gillie was a huge fan of big band music with a particular fondness for the recordings of Glenn Miller and Benny Goodman. His vinyl record library included over 300 78s. He could name most of the musicians and singers, sing most all the lyrics, and dance with considerable agility, often cutting a rug at live New York City performances by these bands.

Throughout his married life Mr. Gillie traveled to many parts of the world with Midge. They often vacationed with their lifelong friends who formed a lively group called the “Loco Pocos,” named after their numerous vacations to the Pocono Mountains. With his family Mr. Gillie also purchased a cabin on Lake Damariscotta, Maine in 1986, a retreat where the Gillies spent each summer and where they enjoyed many hours helping to raise their grandchildren. The couple moved from Scarsdale to Essex Meadows in 1996.  Mr. Gillie was chairman of the Resident Council for five years, directing a number of beneficial programs for the residents and staff including the Essex Meadows Scholarship Fund and implementation of what is now an annual Kentucky Derby Party. Fellow residents referred to him as the “heart and soul” of the special occasion. He was known around the retirement community as a gentle, quick-witted and loyal friend, always ready with a joke and a compassionate ear. He also loved his New York Yankees and New York Giants and continued to play paddle tennis at the Essex Paddle Tennis Club well into his 80s.

Mr. Gillie is survived by his wife Marjorie “Midge” Gillie, their son Dr. Bruce Gillie and his wife Polly of Westerly, R.I., their son Brian Gillie and his wife Sue of Guilford, Conn., and two grandchildren, Bowen and Anne.

The family will hold a private cemetery service in April. Friends are invited to a memorial service at Essex Meadows, 30 Bokum Road, Essex, Conn., on Feb. 28 at 11 a.m. Donations in his memory can be made to the Essex Meadows Scholarship Fund, c/o Essex Meadows, Essex, CT 06426. To share a memory of Mr. Gillie or send a condolence to his family, visit www.rwwfh.com. Arrangements by Robinson, Wright & Weymer Funeral Home, Centerbrook


Dr. Joseph Albright

Dr. Joseph Albright of Sarasota, Fla., who was director of the Scarsdale High School Band for 21 years and Westchester Band director for 31 years, died Jan. 23. He was 88. 

Dr. Albright served in the infantry during World War II, earning three battle stars and a Purple Heart. During the Korean War, he became an Army bandleader.

Dr. Albright studied trumpet with Edward Treutel, William Vacchiano and Harry Glantz. He received his doctorate at Teachers College, Columbia University in 1963. 

Dr. Albright taught for 35 years in the public schools of Yonkers, Mount Vernon and Scarsdale. As director of the Scarsdale High School Band, his Symphonic Band performed in Elizabeth City, N.C., Williamsburg, Va., Washington D.C., Wyalusing, Pa., Boston, Mass., Montreal and Toronto, Canada and a number of times at Lincoln Center. He conducted more than a dozen concerts each summer with the Westchester Band for 31 years. He has served as president of the Westchester County School Music Association, representative for Zone 11 of the New York State School Music Association, and director of the Westchester Music and Arts Camp (now called the Aaron Copland Camp). When he retired, he played in the Suncoast Concert Band and the Sarasota Concert Band in Florida.

“For many years in the Scarsdale schools, I had the privilege of closely   working together with Dr. Joseph Albright. We were close friends and maintained contact long after his retirement. As the conductor of the Scarsdale High School Band and the founder of the Westchester Band, Dr. Albright has left a legacy of excellence with the countless number of Scarsdale  students and adult musicians who  had the opportunity to perform under his direction,” said Dr. Earl Groner.

He is survived by his wife “Pug,” his children Cindy Dowd, MaryBeth Albright, Bob Albright and Joe Albright and nine grandchildren.

A funeral mass was held today, Feb. 6, at St. Michael the Archangel Catholic Church in Sarasota followed by interment at the Veterans’ Cemetery. Packer Funeral Home was in charge of arrangements.


Bernard Pravda

Bernard Pravda, a Scarsdale resident for almost 55 years, died at home Saturday, Jan. 31. He was 95.

Born in 1919 in the Bronx, Mr. Pravda attended New York University and during World War ll was part of a team sent to Purdue University to work on radar technology.

Although Mr. Pravda had an engineering background, he enjoyed a varied career. Initially he was a men’s clothier as part of a family business. He later became a stockbroker and also had a parallel career in the real estate business and as a diamond dealer in Manhattan.

He retired at age 85. His son David said that his father might have retired earlier, but he “enjoyed his bridge game on the 8:02 train.”

Mr. Pravda was outgoing, a very good listener, and offered good advice. His son said he had a remarkable knack with people that made them want to confide in him.

He was predeceased by his wife Muriel.

He is survived by son David Pravda (Lynn) of Scarsdale, daughter Karen (Norbert Elsner) of Scarsdale, daughter Susan (Gabor Garai) of W. Newton, Mass.; grandchildren, Jacqueline (David Bruno), Douglas (Sarah) Pravda, Elizabeth and Michael Garai, Karen, Andrew and Rebecca Elsner; great-grandchildren, Michael and Lily Pravda of Manhattan.

Services were held at graveside.


Pauline Waldstein Rosenbloom

Pauline Waldstein Rosenbloom of Scarsdale died peacefully in her home of 53 years on Feb. 1. She was 92.

A service was held Feb. 4 at the Weinstein Memorial Chapel in Yonkers followed by a burial at Mount Pleasant Cemetery in Hawthorne.

“Paulie” was the wife of the late Robert Rosenbloom, mother of Peter and his wife Lisa, Thomas and his wife Jessica, Jon and his wife Evalyn, and the late James Rosenbloom. She was grandmother of Jessica, Sarah, Nikki, Raquel, Alana, Michael and Everett Rosenbloom. She was the sister of the late Samuel Waldstein.

Donations in her memory can be made to the New York Botanical Garden, Bronx River Parkway at Fordham Road, Bronx, NY 10458 or the Wolf Conservational Center, Wildlife Rescue, 7 Buck Run St., South Salem, NY 10590.


Beth Coleman Stern

Beth Coleman Stern, a lifelong resident of Scarsdale, died peacefully in her sleep Jan. 7. She was 80.

Born in 1934, she attended the Fox Meadow School, graduated from Scarsdale High School and Lasell College. On June 25, 1952 she married Allan D.R. Stern of New York City at her family home in Scarsdale.

Mrs. Stern was loved by family and friends for her loyal support, open heart and a willingness to help all in her world. “You felt free to share anything with her and knew you would never be judged,” they would often say. She was active throughout her life in the Scarsdale community donating her time to numerous local organizations including the Fox Meadow PTA where she was president for several years.

Mrs. Stern was recently predeceased by her husband of 62 years.

She is survived by her three adult children, Douglas Stern (Ellen) of Rye, Michael Stern (Maggie) of Scarsdale, Patricia Frohman of Scarsdale and her seven grandchildren Gregory, Sarah, Katie, Avery, Julia, Matthew and Kyle.

Donations in memory of Beth C. Stern can be made to the Alzheimer's Association of New York, Hudson Valley Chapter, 2 Jefferson Plaza, Suite 203, Poughkeepsie, NY 12601.

Colette Hoey

Colette Hoey, a resident of Scarsdale since 1967, died Jan. 23. She was 73.  She had suffered from MDS, a bone marrow failure disorder, for the past year and a half. She was an administrator in the religious instruction office of Immaculate Heart of Mary Church for more than 35 years.

Mrs. Hoey is survived by her husband of 51 years, Ken Hoey; her son Kevin (Rose) Hoey; and daughters Kristin (John) Gorham, Cindy (John) Wiseman and Kate (Ed) Keller. She is also survived by 10 grandchildren, Jack Gorham, Marykate Gorham, Quinn Wiseman, Sean Wiseman, Kieran Wiseman, Angela Hoey, Daniel Hoey, Eddie Keller, Charlie Keller and Caris Keller, as well as her sister-in-law Vera Mullen and four nephews. She was predeceased by her parents, James and Katherine Mullen, and her brother John Mullen.

“Colette was a loving wife, mother, grandmother, mother-in-law, aunt and friend who enjoyed spending time with her family, bridge group, needlepointing and going to her favorite place on Lake Champlain in the Adirondacks. We will miss her dearly,” her family said.

Services were held Thursday, Jan. 29, at Immaculate Heart of Mary Church in Scarsdale.


John M. Young Jr.

John M. Young Jr. of Southaven, Miss., died Jan. 26 at his home. He was 75.

Mr. Young was born June 28, 1939, in Evanston, Ill., to the late John and Libby Young. They moved to Scarsdale when he was 3 years old and lived there until he attended Arkansas College, where he received his bachelor’s degree in 1963. He has lived in the mid-south since then.

Mr. Young served in the National Guard for six years, six months of which were active duty, and was honorably discharged in 1969. He worked for Graybar Electric for 10 years; then, along with Ken Travis, he co-founded Electri-Com in 1973 and was co-owner until 2012.  

Mr. Young was Presbyterian, an active member of the Whitehaven Country Club and an avid golfer.

He is survived by his wife of 51 years, Paula K. Young of Southaven; a son, John M. Young III of Nashville, Tenn.; a daughter, Leslie Young Hays and her husband, Ricky of Hernando, Miss.; a sister, Anna Carney of Kenilworth, Utah; three grandchildren, Isabella Lorenz, Rick Hays and his wife Jeilenn, and Lauren Hendrix and her husband Bob; two great-grandchildren, Elias Hays and Maddie Hendrix; two nieces, Kelly Lorenz and Brawyn Jones; and a nephew, Lou Jones.

Visitation is today, Jan. 30 from 3 p.m. until the memorial service begins at 4 p.m. at Twin Oaks Funeral Home in Southaven. The family requests that any memorials be made to St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital.


 
Fred L. Rosenberg

Fred L. Rosenberg, a Scarsdale resident from 1958 through 1973, died peacefully on Dec. 23, 2014, a month shy of his 96th birthday while living independently at Kendal on Hudson in Sleepy Hollow. He died 10 years to the day after the death of his wife of 56 years, artist Joan Mattison Rosenberg. The couple treasured their life and friends in Scarsdale as they raised children Eric and Vicki in a beautiful and busy home on Innes Road, his children said.

Born in New York City, Mr. Rosenberg graduated at age 20 in 1939 from Syracuse University, where he was a member of the ZBT fraternity, majored in literature, played outfield for the Syracuse baseball team and later semi-pro ball in Boston, and crooned with an orchestra. His dream of going on to graduate school to become a college professor was cut short by the need to earn a living and the approaching war. Enlisting in the Navy, he went to midshipman's school at Notre Dame and served as lieutenant on LST 281, landing on D-Day, and later in southern Europe, and was ultimately captain of LST 357 in the Pacific. Proud of his service, yet a pacifist at heart who enlisted in the Navy because he did not want to pull a trigger at another man, Mr. Rosenberg participated in LST crew reunions and the 50th anniversary of the landings where he was greeted personally by President Clinton in a televised ceremony at Normandy.

Following World War II, Mr. Rosenberg went on to success as a textile marketing executive for manufacturers in the Boston area and later in New York when the family moved to Scarsdale, as the locus of textile manufacturing moved south. His greatest creative successes in the business came as he headed the circular knit division of Fab Industries, where he created and named many iconic fabrics, including "Supersuede.” 

The Rosenbergs enjoyed an active life in Scarsdale, where Joan led a cub scout troop and Brownies, specializing in artistic efforts, and Fred coached "Dad's Club" B-team baseball for Heathcote. The team finally won the league championship in son Eric's eighth-grade year, thanks to Mr. Rosenberg’s savvy negotiation dividing up talent with the coach of the A-team.

Mr. Rosenberg enjoyed racquet sports on the Scarsdale public courts, becoming particularly proficient in platform tennis with players including John Vogel, Oscar Sachs, Ed Fogel and Alan Guttman, on the original Brite Avenue wooden court. He also shared a Rhodes 19 sailboat with his dear friend and neighbor Clifford Rich, which they raced with their children for years in the Long Island Sound fleet.

An unabashed liberal and member of Americans for Democratic Action, Mr. Rosenberg volunteered in the congressional campaigns of John F. Kennedy while living in the Boston area, and continued to support progressive causes in Scarsdale and the nation. He was pleased to see changes in society, big and small, including his son's ultimate membership in the Scarsdale Golf Club in 1991, where Mr. Rosenberg enjoyed many rounds as Eric's guest in later years, the last just three months ago. He had a perspective that allowed him to compare the vitriol directed to President Franklin Roosevelt with the opposition faced by President Obama.

When Mr. Rosenberg retired from textiles and he and his wife moved to Manhattan, he finally had a chance to return full time to his love of literature and music. As a child he had been a favorite piano pupil of prominent composer Paul Creston; as a retiree he became a published playwright, composed a musical and plays that were given staged performances, and focused on a memoir and poetry in his final years. When he died, he had been preparing to perform as solo singer and harmonica player at the Kendal on Hudson New Year's Eve celebration with his new Kendal colleagues.

Mr. Rosenberg stayed in touch with friends from many segments of his life, including in particular his Syracuse fraternity. He was proud to see daughter Vicki begin college at Syracuse, before transferring to Barnard to complete her education, and he drew great satisfaction from her profession as a publicist for many major book publishing companies. 

Warm, loving and spiritual, Mr. Rosenberg is survived by his sister Janet Black of Pocasset, Mass; his daughter Vicki Rosenberg of Ardsley; his son Eric and daughter-in-law Helen (who met at Scarsdale High School and live in Mamaroneck); and his grandchildren, Karen Rosenberg of Manhattan, and Stuart M. Rosenberg and his wife Halsey Varady of Redwood City, Calif.

A memorial service will be held Sunday, Jan. 25, at 11 a.m. at Temple Emanu-el, Fifth Avenue at 65th Street, to which Scarsdale friends are welcome. Contributions in Mr. Rosenberg’s memory may be made to The Art Students League of New York, attn: Joan M. Rosenberg Memorial Scholarship Fund, 215 West 57th St., New York, NY 10019.  


Charles Edward Lange

Former Scarsdale High School teacher Charles (“Chuck”) Edward Lange died in Bozeman, Mont., Nov. 29. He was 83.

Mr. Lange was born in New York City in 1931 and lived much of his life in Larchmont, N.Y.

Throughout his life, Mr. Lange deeply valued his relationships with others, especially his loving ties and deep commitment to family including his mother, sister, wife, children, nieces and grandchildren, his family said.

In 1959, Mr. Lange fell in love and married Jean Duncan, his sister’s roommate at Union Theological Seminary in New York City. He returned to Larchmont in 1966, where he and Jean raised their family and lived until 2003 when they moved to Bozeman.

His family will remember him as a sharp-witted intellectual and generous humanitarian who was always engaged in the world around him. While he was not an athlete or outdoorsman, frequent New England hiking outings and sailing in Connecticut sparked a love of the outdoors in his children. He also shared his love of travel with his family — though as a deeply rooted New Yorker, he never anticipated that his children would lead him to spend his last 11 years in the Rocky Mountains.

Mr. Lange’s life was shaped by his deep and broad-ranging intellectual and spiritual journey. He credited a number of inspiring teachers and professors with shaping his beliefs, values and critical thinking. In turn, he touched many lives as an English teacher and as an Episcopal minister. His intellectual and spiritual journey included spending his senior high school year at Sherborne School in Dorset, England; graduating cum laude with highest honors in English literature from Williams College in Massachusetts; and extensive graduate studies including master of divinity, master of religious education and M.A. in English degrees. He enjoyed a 30-year career as a high school English teacher, including 26 years at Scarsdale High School (1967-93). His career as an Episcopal minister spanned 50 years including several years in Massachusetts as assistant rector at St. John’s Church in Williamstown and as Episcopal chaplain at Harvard and Radcliffe. Throughout his teaching career and after his retirement, he frequently assisted with services, often preaching thought-provoking sermons at a variety of churches, especially St. John’s in Larchmont. He preached his final sermons while serving a small congregation in Manhattan, Mont.

His wife predeceased him. He is survived by son, Ted Lange, Ted’s wife, Christine Phillips, and their son, Ian of Bozeman; by daughter, Jennifer Lange Schneider, her husband, Sam Schneider, and their children, Toby and Robin of Spokane, Wash.; and by his sister, June Wright and her family who live in Maryland.

In lieu of flowers, the family requests donations to Heart of the Valley Animal Shelter, PO Box 11390, Bozeman, MT 59719, where Mr. Lange adopted Mac the cat who has been his companion since his wife’s death.

Arrangements are in the care of Dokken-Nelson Funeral Service, www.dokkennelson.com.


Obituaries 2014

Obituaries 2013

Obituaries 2012